Featured posts


Netdata: simple server monitoring

I have been looking for an easy-to-use monitoring solution for Phusion's servers. One that does not require a lot of setup and that provides a reasonable interface without too much work. Such a solution has to display a bunch of graphs at the very least. (Email) alerting is considered a bonus. The solution also has to be open source, not only because of the cost factor but because I want to own my data. So solutions like New Relic and Datadog are out.

In this blog post I will describe the solutions that I've checked out – Ganglia, Monit, Munin, Prometheus, Grafana – and why I didn't like them. Then I will explain why I think Netdata is a good choice and review its pros and cons.

Read more »

Understanding your benchmarks and easy tips for fixing them

Update August 9: urikanegun has kindly contributed a Japanese translation of this article.

Developers love speed, so developers love benchmarks. Benchmarks on programming language performance, app server performance, JavaScript engine performance, etc. have always attracted a lot of attention. However, there are lots of caveats involved in running a good benchmark. One of those caveats is benchmark stability: if you run a benchmark multiple times then the timings usually differ a bit. A a lot of people have the tendency to hand-wave this caveat by just shutting down all apps, rerunning the benchmark a few times and averaging the results. Is that truly good enough?

Lately, I have been researching the topic of benchmark stability because I am interested in creating reliable benchmarks that are reproducible by third parties, so that they can verify benchmark results by themselves — e.g. allowing users of my software to verify that my benchmarks are reliable. Such research has led me to Victor Stinner, a Python core developer who has been focusing on improving Python 3 performance for several years.

Read more »
Page 2 of 2